Undoubtedly True, But…

Warren Meyer is correct. But I can tell you that the motivation behind small enterprises banding together to form associations and seeking regulatory legislation is very often to afford them some ability to operate free of arbitrary regulation and enforcement. You see, we’ve reached a point in this country where anything not explicitly permitted under law and subject to regulatory oversight is seen as suspect, possibly or probably illegal, or shady. And regulators take advantage of that. Everything new that comes along eventually gets attacked, and in the absence of specifically contemplated statutes, new and creative enterprises get square pegged into whatever regulatory scheme can be kinda made to fit. If you operate nationally, multiply that by 50. Trust me: if you have to do business, it’s simply cheaper and ultimately easier to do so under even an onerous and oppressive regulatory mess than to operate out in the clear. Because if you happen to be successful, the regulators will come calling and you won’t be able to point to specific authority to operate. And that equals hundreds of thousands in attorney fees. I speak from much personal experience, but now is not a good time to go into detail.

Read More

Hey, Sports Fans :)

I just have to wonder. I haven’t a doubt in the world that there are thousands upon thousands of smart, sports statistic-calculating guys and gals who, even though they may not approve of Barry Bonds’ use of steroids, nonetheless see the utter shame in bringing this indictment for lying to the state — and after a four year (four years!) prosecution “investigation” at that. But I wonder how many sensed it when they hauled up Martha Stewart under precisely the same set of nefarious pretenses. It’s not like I didn’t point out the principles underlying this whole pretentious, presumptuous, preposterous mess of “lying to federal prosecutors” (and in spite of the euphemisms, that’s exactly what a federal Grand Jury is: a prosecutor). So who’s next? I mean, it’s very unlikely that normal, everyday people are going to stop lying to protect themselves from embarrassment and shame. So the only question is: how many lives of essentially good people will be destroyed, their families torn to shreds and needlessly shamed, financially ruined, perp walked, prosecuted, and jailed before someone gets a clue and acknowledges — even if only on a practical level — that, hey, news fucking flash: people lie about…

Read More

An Afternoon Converation

Bea: OK, I’m going shopping at my favorite place. Do you know what that is? Me: Uh, Pet Smart? Bea: No; close. Me: Andy’s Pet Shop? Bea: No; Good Will. Me: Sweetie, that’s not shopping. That’s rummaging.

Read More

Fundamental and Essential: Honesty

Ask yourself: whose counsel would you prefer, that of an honest man who was often proved wrong, or that of a dishonest man who virtually everyone thinks is right and a sage? Back a week or so ago, Warren Meyer, in his new and excellent Climate Skeptic blog, alerted readers to what was not yet known to be a hoax, but which he nonetheless labeled as such — in spite of the fact that the “study” came in on the side of anthropogenic global warming skeptics. Warren clearly saw that it was a hoax intended to expose skeptics as dishonest. I have therefore come to the conclusion that this hoax is likely the work of global warming catastrophists. My guess is that they wanted to make a point that skeptics were no such thing — that skeptics would bite like a hungry bass at such a lure as long as it supported their position. And certain folks in political circles did so, at least for a few hours. My presumption is that if we had all trumpeted this fake study, then our judgment on other issues would get called into question. My sense is that catastrophists have convinced themselves with…

Read More

Fly Falling

One of the most critical things for a student pilot to learn is the radical difference in glide slope control between power on and power off. In fact, with power on, glide is primarily controlled using various power settings within a functional range of angle of attack. However, without any power, glide slope is primarily a function of airspeed, and airspeed is a function of angle of attack. It’s for this reason that glider pilots have a head start when they take up power. They have a good part of the emergency procedures wired, and more importantly, they don’t panic when they lose power. At any rate, here’s the most impressive demonstration of “power off” glide slope control you’re ever going to see. I got this via Radley Balko.

Read More

The Least Understood, Least Analyzed and Most Overlooked Aspect of Ron Paul’s American Campaign

The international effect, which, prior to the Internet, would not have been possible or even conceivable. YouTube (multimedia) ratchets it to an even higher level. One must wonder if Paul’s campaign has already set in motion something with global geopolitical ramifications that will eventually change this world forever. If granted the premise that Paul’s campaign will have a lasting and profoundly positive effect on political freedom somewhere, I’d have to bet that in the end, it won’t be here. I think that when America (the ideal) does actually rise again, if at all, it will be someplace other than primarily within the borders of the United States.

Read More

Understanding Ron Paul

While Justin Raimondo does a decent job of showing that neither John Derbyshire nor Jonah Goldberg understand Ron Paul, he doesn’t quite nail it all the way, I think. But first, this captures the essence of the smear campaign against Paul, when Goldberg says, “The left is perfectly happy to blur the lines between a mainstream conservative and a Klansmen,” and Raimondo responds: One can just substitute the word “neocon” for “liberal,” in the above, and come up with the reason why Paul should ignore the Smear Brigade and soldier on: because we all know the neocons are “perfectly happy” to “blur the lines” between a paleocon-libertarian and a Klansman. Yes, the point I made yesterday. It’s for very good reasons that Raimondo and others, including myself, think that Paul ought to keep ignoring this whole thing and simply refuse to comment on it at all, or do anything else “politicians are supposed to do.” And there’s the real crux of it, the part Raimondo danced around a bit, but didn’t quite nail. This would be the point of agreement between Goldberg and Derbyshire. Did you catch it? Derbyshire says, “All I took away from that American Thinker piece was…

Read More

Someone Had To Do It

And I can’t think of anyone better than the always professional Balko to show what a stupid ass Mona Charen is. I still have Do-Gooders in my stack somewhere waiting to be read, and I think I might just toss it out. It’s too bad — but good, really — that establishment republicans are now exposing themselves as the liars I must conclude they’ve always been. Such a widespread and appalling smear campaign directed at Paul is really proof positive that they never meant any of it. It was all just a “political stance,” to them. And make no mistake: they know very well that they are attempting to impugn the character of a decent, kind, honest man who happens to be the most consistent politician in upholding supposed conservative values and principles in at least a hundred years, if not all time. What miserable fuckers.

Read More

Parking Lots

Went to Fry’s today for various computing curiosities, and this was parked right next to me when I returned to my car. That iPhone camera is certainly handy. Of course, this is the sort of instance where if I have to tell you what it is, and it’s significance, it wouldn’t matter to you anyway.

Read More

Evolutionary Fitness Update

Haven’t posted on this topic in a while, so I’ll be you thought I gave it up, eh? Not so, though I still eat far too much crap, and as this interesting case study demonstrates, it’s definitely a combination. Go take a look at this stunning example. He also links to a short writeup by the trainer, in Word format. I don’t know about you, but when I see a couple of people take control and attain that kind of success, I’m just really happy for them. Apparently, the before photos are taken two months after they had begun weight training. The after photos were taken three months later, after simply switching to a “Paleo” diet, i.e., meat, fish, poultry, fruits and vegetables with no caloric limit set. Another way to look at it is: no grain-based products like bread and pasta, no junk food like chips and candy, and if you’re going to eat fruit, eat actual fruit and not juice, which is too sugar concentrated. I’m still on track with the intense workouts twice per week and estimate that I’ve added about 20 lbs. of lean mass since I began last May. Still walking a bit over three…

Read More

Mac’s Exposé

In 20 years of using PCs, I never thought to check if there was 3rd-party software that would do something so useful. Apple built it right into the Mac OS. I don’t think I’ve ever run an application full screen — and I want to rip my hair out when I see others do it. Windows… Get it? Well, if not, here; get it:

Read More

Watch the Close

It’s chic to check overnight markets, futures, currency, and so on in order to get a bead on how markets will open. Yea, I’ve done it myself. Still do, sometimes. But that’s typically to sniff out something really major. It’s seductive, because you can predict how the market will open with pretty solid accuracy by looking at the futures. But the first hour of trading is regarded by most traders as “amateur hour.” Someone said on CNBC this morning that a pro doesn’t watch the open, he watches the close. Yep, I can attest that I get a far better read on things by looking at the close. Today was an example of something to pay attention to if you’re looking for signs of a short-term reversal such as the end of this recent correction. First, you’ve got a huge up day. Second, it began up, drove up hard, took a breather for lunch in NY, and recommenced for the remainder of the day, actually accelerating into the close. Very opposite of Friday where the market posted good gains but couldn’t hold them. Traders didn’t want to stay long over the weekend (opening gaps down can be brutal in declining…

Read More

Bigger, and a Better Theme

Much as I enjoyed the November 5th “money bomb,” and much as it exceeded my expectations, the theme was a bit obscure and perhaps just a bit racy for a presidential campaign. But could you think of a better theme than the Boston Tea Party? Brilliant. One must wonder if the clever “nobody” who organized this, who doesn’t work for the campaign and whom Paul has never met, had this in mind all along. Now, with more time in which to sign up pledges, a far better American Revolution theme, and the benefit of both hindsight and the confidence of success, I won’t be the slightest bit surprised to see the one-day fund raising record reset to over $10 million. The sign up rate is far out pacing that last effort. Not only that, but while 17,500 people signed up for Nov 5th, about double that actually contributed. The best quote about all this I’ve seen lately goes to Paul Gottfried. He is a wonderful embarrassment to our two odious national parties. Hell ya. You know what? I could care less if the country does go to hell in a handbasket because of what Paul is doing. Fuck you if…

Read More

Finally!

Finally, finally a cop gets a reprimand for tasering someone he shouldn’t have. I’ve seen hundreds of these, and reprimands — much less firings — or [longingly] worse — are close to, if not, nonexistent. It’s typically the sick pretense of a “full investigation,” followed by a finding of “no wrongdoing.” Oh, yea. The person he tasered was himself. (link: rockwell)

Read More

American Gangster

I agree with Lew. It’s funny. I like both Russel Crow and Denzel Washington, most of the time. I think this would be the first time where I’d like to have seen Crow get a bullet in the head. He was the “good guy,” as defined by the state; whereas, Washington was the “bad guy” by the same definition. Problem is, Crow was a thief and thug; whereas, Washington was an honest — albeit ruthless — businessman. I was talking with Bea afterwards, and she just couldn’t grok my 180-out perspective on the thing. But it’s really simple. Just imagine the whole scenario with the pretense and outrageous presumption of the authority of the state and the law stripped away. Just think in terms of mutual agreement between people, conscience, honesty, the golden rule. From where I sat, Washington was a man of his word, never stole a dime, and delivered the highest quality value at the lowest price. According to the pre-credits factoids about real-life Frank Lucas at the end of the film, the state stole $250 million of money he’s earned honestly, jailed him for 15 years, and jailed 30 of his family members.

Read More

The Folly of Unionism

Without doing any fact checking, this is nonetheless ponderous and interesting. Fuck Lincoln. Maybe Breckinridge would have let the south go on their merry way (and left the north in peace) to become the third-world offshoot they’d have been destined to be. But that’s idle speculation in an area I know not much about. Well, given the outcome, I supose it’s preferable to re-fight the Civil War once ever four years at the voting booth. If that post is accurate, it’s the very same economic dynamic underlying the whole thing (if you think the Civil War was about freeing slaves on moral grounds, go back to [a good] school). Nothing really essential and fundamental has changed. Damn collectivism.

Read More

Anarchy Update

I just caught the 4th season, 6th episode of Boston Legal last night on the DVR, which had aired November 6th; The Object of My Affection. I’ve been a fan of this series since it was in the process of spinning off from The Practice (and it’s far better). The reasons I’m a fan are numerous, and I neither have the time nor inclination to go into it much. The biggest reason is David Spade, of course, and last night he delivered another amazing closing argument. So; a mother’s daughter is bludgeoned to death with a vodka bottle by rich boyfriend, who through fancy legal footwork, gets off — even though the premise of the story is that he did indeed do it. Mother later walks into [ex] boyfriend’s office, announces she’s there to kill him, and puts one between the eyes and is delighted about doing it. That was one thing about the story I liked. She was never portrayed for one second as anything but perfectly satisfied — indeed proud — of her act of vengeful killing. A previous episode dealt with the whole setup, and one of the sub-plots in this one was the actual trial. First…

Read More

An Interesting Round of Ron Paul Commentary

I’ll toss them up without comment. Andrew Sullivan on the hilarious reactions from the business-as-usual crowd. Daniel Larison on the “fear and loathing in conventional Republican circles.” Daniel Weigel makes NRO’s David Frum look stupid, which judging by this account isn’t too hard to do. So there you have it.

Read More