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Links & Quick Hits: Paleo Popularity and the State of the “Experts”

~ Heather B. Armstrong, just about one of the most popular bloggers in the whole world at dooce.com, went Paleo. And here’s an update: More about this fad diet humans ate for millions of years.

~ What’s cool is that the “Caveman Diet Gains Popularity” in spite of all the hand wringing by stupid, ignorant dietitians, nutritionists, “experts” and the government.

The paleo diet movement is backed by some academics and fitness gurus, and has gained some praise in medical research in the United States and elsewhere even though it goes against recommendations of most mainstream nutritionists and government guidelines.

Loren Cordain, a professor of health and exercise science at Colorado State University, said he believes millions in the United States and elsewhere are following the paleo diet movement, based on sales of books such as his own and Internet trends.

What, you mean to tell me that millions of people are “go[ing] against recommendations of most mainstream nutritionists and government guidelines,” on purpose, explicitly? Damn fuckin’ straight, and for good reason. It is precisely this ignoble, inglorious infestation of self-serving Big Food whores that Americans — and increasingly the rest of the world — are in this lousy mess.

But a US News survey of nutritionists ranked the paleo diet last among 20 possible options, far below the Mediterranean, vegan, or Weight Watchers diets.

It noted that the paleo diet gets 23 percent of calories from carbohydrates compared to 45 percent to 65 percent in U.S. government recommendations, and that the Stone Age regime is higher than recommended for protein and fat.

“While its focus on veggies and lean meat is admirable, experts couldn’t get past the fact that entire food groups, like dairy and grains, are excluded on paleo diets,” US News said.

Marion Nestle, professor of nutrition, food studies, and public health at New York University, told AFP that the paleo diet “would not be appropriate for today’s sedentary lifestyles.””

Nestle and others also dispute some of the historical claims of paleo diet advocates. “The claim that half the calories in the Paleolithic diet came from meat is difficult to confirm,” she said.

In a research paper, Nestle said the life expectancy of Stone Age man was around 25 years, “suggesting that the Paleolithic diet, among other life conditions, must have been considerably less than ideal.”

Well that tears it. Marion Nestle is just another ignorant doofus spouting conventional “wisdom,” whom I wouldn’t trust to go fetch my mail, and you shouldn’t either. Just shut the fuck up, Nestle.

~ Eat your veggies, now: Vegetarianism produces subclinical malnutrition, hyperhomocysteinemia and atherogenesis.

CONCLUSION: The low dietary intake of protein and sulfur amino acids by a plant-eating population leads to subclinical protein malnutrition, explaining the origin of hyperhomocysteinemia and the increased vulnerability of these vegetarian subjects to cardiovascular diseases.

Quick, call the “experts.”

~ OK, well how about “health care specialists at UCSF Medical Center,” who are said to have “reviewed” this bit of stupid tripe for publication: Top Ten Foods for Health. Water, dark green vegetables, whole grains, beans and lentils, fish, berries, winter squash, soy, flaxseed, nuts and seeds, and organic yogurt.

Where’s the liver?

Richard Nikoley

I'm Richard Nikoley. Free The Animal began in 2003 and as of 2021, contains 5,000 posts. I blog what I wish...from health, diet, and food to travel and lifestyle; to politics, social antagonism, expat-living location and time independent—while you sleep—income. I celebrate the audacity and hubris to live by your own exclusive authority and take your own chances. Read More

17 Comments

  1. Jared on September 30, 2011 at 12:43

    I’m almost surprised they didn’t say “low fat yogurt.”

    It’s funny, I just a new version of the “Healthy Plate” recommendation done by Harvard “experts.” In their analysis, they recommend that people eat “healthy fats,” which includes CANOLA OIL. WTF???

    • mpix123 on September 30, 2011 at 14:40

      Try buying a yougurt that isn’t low fat- most are no fat. Fage decided not to sell t”Total” anywhere ‘cept foir WFs At least the single serving size. Cabot, the VT cheese makers make a pretty good ‘Greek” full fat but only in the big size and cheaper.

      btw – is they any diet that is good for a seditary life stytle? Seems the cart is before the horse

      • mpix123 on September 30, 2011 at 14:55

        sorry for all the typos, my phone keyboard is so tiny and I have big caveman hands.



  2. wilberfan on September 30, 2011 at 13:14

    I thought it quite interesting when Heather went Paleo. If you follow her blog, you’ll note that she’s training for a marathon–but doesn’t seem to have caught on to the barefoot-minimalist thing yet… And I think she’s still pretty obsessed with “cardio”. Guess you can’t change everything at once!

    • Richard Nikoley on September 30, 2011 at 13:18

      I’d never heard of her until someone posted that first link in comments a while back. I’ve since checked out her blog now and then. I suppose it just goes to show that what really gets people to read a blog is the personal aspect of it, and she’s very good at that; and of course, an engaging writer who mixes things up.

      I do note that some of my own most popular posts — some years old that reel in several thousand reads per month, still — are posts about personal experiences.

      Well, go figure. That was the original idea of a “blog” in the first place.

  3. Debbie on September 30, 2011 at 13:30

    Nice use of that ridiculous top ten list of bullshit.
    Kudos on keeping the rants alive, I Love them!
    deb

  4. rob on September 30, 2011 at 13:41

    That Heather chick is eating candy bars for breakfast, somebody needs to tell her she’s doing it wrong.

  5. Dave on September 30, 2011 at 14:06

    Thanks for this post Richard – I’ve been primal for about a year and a half and haven’t felt better. My wife has lost around 60 lbs. and has gone from whining about a 2 km walk to kicking ass at kettlebell – last night she did this (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TCsVnvubjYo) with a 35 lb kettlebell and kicked ass.

    Thank you for the work you do on this blog, it is much appreciated.

  6. dr. gabriella kadar on September 30, 2011 at 15:17

    When is wine going to have its own food group? I want to see it on the ‘pyramid’. Nutritiondata.com, which has no information about wine (i.e. it has at least the same potassium content as grape juice) makes me think that possibly the religious anti-alcohol lobby won’t accept any positive information on the website which is factually totally wrong. But like Ms Marion Nestle, there are other interests influencing promotion of mis-information or lack of information.

    Do you have any idea how many people avoid consuming organ meats or eggs because ‘they are high in cholesterol’? It doesn’t matter what information these people are provided, they have been ‘brainwashed’ (which is something that apparently doesn’t actually exist).

    “What’s your brain made of?”
    “Cholesterol.”
    “So what’s the problem?”

    arghhhhh……………………………………………………………. This is a good reason for including wine as a food group. (have I made my case? 😉 )

    (A report from ‘the trenches’)

    • Richard Nikoley on September 30, 2011 at 15:58

      Well, Gabriella, the key word if this is authority.

      Even Nesle, who is pretty much a real foodie so far as I can gather, will have you munching Doritos before she’ll give up that status. The only thing to know it that there is a sightly real food admonishment within the establishment of CW, and that’s what Nesle keys on, because she is part of the establishment CW.

      Just another whore, just more clever about it and high class,,

      • dr. gabriella kadar on September 30, 2011 at 18:18

        Her opinions are ‘ingrained’.

        g



  7. Natalie on September 30, 2011 at 20:11

    “Marion Nestle, professor of nutrition, food studies, and public health at New York University, told AFP that the Paleo diet “would not be appropriate for today’s sedentary lifestyles.”

    Really, Ms Nestle? Because, what, we need even more obesity, diabetes, heart disease, cancer, celiac disease – all related to high carb (especially refined carbs) consumption?

    I’ve lost 20 lbs in two months continuing living the “sedentary lifestyle”. We actually have less margin of error as compared to even our grand parents. We’re the sickest generation ever (and probably with the least amount of freedom, too).

    • Montie on October 1, 2011 at 18:31

      “We actually have less margin of error as compared to even our grand parents. We’re the sickest generation ever (and probably with the least amount of freedom, too).”

      Natalie, you are so right on both counts.

  8. Daisy on October 1, 2011 at 13:41

    Remarkable that “experts” don’t seem to think veganism is extreme by eliminating ALL animal products, but paleo is extreme because of dairy and grain restrictions?

    • Montie on October 1, 2011 at 18:39

      Daisy (gotta love that name, it’s my mom’s too), I noticed that same thing. They always talk about how dangerous paleo is because it “eliminates entire food groups”, but they NEVER say that about veganism which eliminates ALL animal products of any kind if strictly followed.

      Funny too, how I lost 30+ pounds in a couple of months by eliminating those food groups, felt better, was no longer diabetic, hypertensive or suffering with GERD. And…all that while I was still leading a “sedentary lifestyle” before I even STARTED an exercise routine.

      • Natalie on October 2, 2011 at 17:09

        I, too, waited about three months before starting the weight training regimen. I think it’s actually a good idea to do one big change at a time since the change in the diet is often accompanied by certain side effects. Plus, you’d feel far more energy with more time on the paleo lifestyle.



  9. Robbo on October 3, 2011 at 12:40

    Quote “The claim that half the calories in the Paleolithic diet came from meat is difficult to confirm,”

    Well, coupla things easy to confirm:
    Percent of calories in Paleolithic diet from HFCS = nil
    Percent of calories in Paleolithic diet from “healthy wholegrains” = nil
    ……
    Oh yes,
    Percent of calories in Paleolithic diet from fresh air = nil

    I wonder where the other half of their calories came from 😉

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