scratch-mark

Sitting Back and Watching; Eating Beans and Reflecting

I call out Dr. Eades explicitly; and what, I ask, would you expect to happen?

I expected a lot different but the comment thread demonstrates otherwise.

People (enough) are tired of hubris, laziness, dismissiveness, dogma, intransigence, and the list could go on. It’s a Brave New World and it’s not designer. I’m not designing. I’m just reporting, integrating, and synthesizing new data and insights into what I hope to be new Animal Understandings.

Good thing I never bankrolled an investment into some status-quo that requires a return—or I look like a fucktard on nonessential grounds (like selling wrong).

…I suppose people think that once one shatters some dogma for them (e.g., Eades; saturated fat), they can safely cuddle up as sycophant. I suppose further that said guru just gets to relax and tag any detractor with a lack of “basic understandings.” No need to explain. They’rebasic misunderstandings.’ No elaboration necessary. ‘We got something right; everything heretofore is settled.’

Well, to get very practical, I’m basically coming to understand that legumes, in particular, are quite amazing qua dietary staple.

IMG 2725
Five Bean Soup with Polish Sausage, Tomatoes, Onion and Cabbage

…I’m tired of trying to figure out which bean is best, how to prepare it, how to re-prepare it, etc.

I drop a plastic supermarket bag of 5-bean soup into a cooking pot without rinsing or soaking, and here’s the deal.

  • 1 bag 5-bean soup mix. Ditch the pork-flavor packet.
  • 1 Qt Kitchen Basics unsalted beef stock.
  • 1 28oz (big) can of diced tomatoes
  • 1 medium onion, diced
  • 2 Polska Keilbassas, chopped up
  • 1/2 head of cabbage, chopped

Put everything in the pot except the cabbage, add water as needed (about another qt, over time) as the beans soak stuff up. Add the cabbage in the last hour or so.

It’s done when the beans are tender. Crock pot works great for this and you won’t overcook unless you’re a special sort of fucktard.

Eat ’em hot, eat ’em cold and reheated, and then eat ’em frozen, thawed and reheated. Repeat.

…It’s very interesting when you spend much time in solitude. I’ve written this before, many times, but it pays to repeat. Back when I used to spend weeks—and a few times, months—at sea before there was any sort of electronic communication (letters came on paper, delivered by a helicopter dropping a bag on the deck), I noticed that it was healthy to get away from everyone. I formulated thusly:

My favorite day at sea is the first day. That’s the day when you get away from everyone who’s trying to help you.

Are those who insist that you bow to them because their detractors lack “basic understandings” trying to help you?

Of course they are. Try a few days at sea…or, a couple of weeks in isolation in a mountain cabin.

There is no downside to expansion of perspective.

The return path to having everyone in your business, thoughts, and desires 24/7/365 is essentially what the modern world is designed for.

Richard Nikoley

I'm Richard Nikoley. Free The Animal began in 2003 and as of 2021, contains 5,000 posts. I blog what I wish...from health, diet, and food to travel and lifestyle; to politics, social antagonism, expat-living location and time independent—while you sleep—income. I celebrate the audacity and hubris to live by your own exclusive authority and take your own chances. Read More

30 Comments

  1. J+Wynia on November 1, 2014 at 20:16

    I’ve been doing a similar concoction (though a thicker consistency than soup/stew) which is great over scrambled eggs for breakfast.

  2. Jake on November 1, 2014 at 20:34

    I think at some point many of the mainstream pundits of this or that regimen (not limited to the field of nutrition) move past proponent and become in essence a “brand” unto themselves, and they develop loyal consumer base who is comfortable with the product. Witness “New Coke”, wins every blind taste test and goes on to become one of the most spectacular marketing blunders of all time because most folks, being sheep, are unwilling to move past a comfort zone once they’ve found one. This is the corner these folks like Dr. Eades have painted themselves into, and being far from “stupid” realize this and instead of being upfront and beginning with he premise that nothing is ever “settled” find themselves forced to either pander to their base or lose them. Some, like Sisson are savvy enough to read the tea leaves and make adjustments, but it will always be those who simply don’t give a fuck about mollifying a fawning base who will be the tip of the intellectual spear.

    • Richard Nikoley on November 1, 2014 at 20:41

      “but it will always be those who simply don’t give a fuck about mollifying a fawning base who will be the tip of the intellectual spear.”

      Whistling in the wind, me. 🙂

    • Boundless on November 2, 2014 at 07:55

      > Witness “New Coke”, wins every blind taste test
      > and goes on to become one of the most
      > spectacular marketing blunders of all time …

      Perhaps the real blunder was forgetting the whole point of brand recognition:
      people don’t buy pop blindfolded.

      People who buy “Coca Cola” are generally wedded to the branding, for otherwise they’d spend massively less on generic cola.

      These loyalists, however, were predisposed to suspect that Coke could screw up the product, thanks to the earlier Tab product, and the not quite convincing Diet Coke.

      The whole thing was amusing to observe at the time, as I’d previously decided that pop of any kind was a sugar disaster, and the artificial sweeteners highly suspect.

      Then there’s the matter of why New Coke won at blind testing. I now suspect it was due to the free fructose in the HFCS.

      To circle around to the current teapot tempest, many non-mainstream nutrition advocates have themselves become brands, whether by accident or intention.

      They need to avoid the brand trap, which means avoiding dogma, and being clear to their followers that their advocacies should be expected to shift as unconfounded science and actual results roll in.

    • Richard Nikoley on November 2, 2014 at 08:46

      The essential problem here is that a sweet, delicious beverage like cola ought to be regarded similarly to wine, beer and spirits.

      Recently, as a treat for football Sunday, I got a 6-pack in bottles of one of those artisan brands of cola with all natural flavors, sweetened with cane sugar. Bea and I would split one bottle. Delicious.

      The six pack lasted for 3 football Sundays for 2 people.

    • Jake on November 2, 2014 at 12:09

      “To circle around to the current teapot tempest, many non-mainstream nutrition advocates have themselves become brands, whether by accident or intention.

      They need to avoid the brand trap, which means avoiding dogma, and being clear to their followers that their advocacies should be expected to shift as unconfounded science and actual results roll in.”

      That is my point, once you brand yourself you develop loyal consumers. Loyal consumers by default do not like changes to the product, that was what I was getting out with the New Coke analogy. It makes sense with soft drinks, they are what they are; with science, not so much because it will move on with or without you. That’s what is unique about the types who frequent FTA, the reveling in finding out you’re wrong because it means you have learned something, and the absolute glee with which old ideas are modified or abandoned and new ones embraced.

    • Richard Nikoley on November 2, 2014 at 13:51

      “That’s what is unique about the types who frequent FTA, the reveling in finding out you’re wrong because it means you have learned something, and the absolute glee with which old ideas are modified or abandoned and new ones embraced.”

      Another satisfied customer.

    • pzo on November 3, 2014 at 06:47

      I thought the New Coke was flavored to be more like Pepsi. Was HFCS even being used back then? It was only invented in the 1960’s, IIRC.

      Maybe the lesson is “When your product is #1 in sales, don’t make it like #2!” Sheesh.

  3. Jake on November 1, 2014 at 20:50

    As far as beans, gotta feed the resident gut population before you think about feeding yourself. That doesn’t mean it can’t be tasty tho 😀 I have some Borlotti’s soaking, gonna do em tamarra with Sopresatta, Chorizo, onion & garlic. Good stuff

    http://i61.tinypic.com/sxfxg8.jpg

  4. Richard Nikoley on November 2, 2014 at 09:20

    Laf.

    Dr. Eades approved another comment today. Sorry, he doesn’t have comment permalinks enabled and I care too little to make one.

    He approved a Standard Spew from the Razwell Virus. What’s worse? He told him to go for it. Apparently, Mike is pressed for time (again and always).

  5. Sean D. on November 2, 2014 at 12:53

    Hate to cry ‘toxins’ as I’m a huge fan of legumes in general (and most other ‘toxic’ foods paleos avoid), but are you sure it’s wise to recommend that people cook unsoaked beans in a crock pot? Some legumes, especially red kidney, have very high levels of the toxin phytohaemagglutinin, and the concentration of this toxin can increase up to 5 fold at lower temperatures (anything between 130 and 170F). It takes about 10 minutes of boiling fully hydrated beans to totally denature this toxin and a some crock pots (especially cheaper ones) don’t get hot enough to do this. A lot of people also assume that crock pots and slow cookers are the same thing, and using a slow cooker instead of crock pot would be an even worse idea since slow cookers almost universally are incapable of getting liquids up to a constant boil. You also have the 1-2 hours it takes for the unsoaked beans to hydrate in the warm water, increasing the concentration of this toxin substantially during that time. Best to stick to stovetop cooking when working with unsoaked beans in my opinion so you can rapidly bring them up to a boil and then boil them for the first 20-30 minutes and then reduce the heat for the remainder of the time. Pressure cookers are especially great for quickly cooking unsoaked beans too.

    • Richard Nikoley on November 2, 2014 at 17:14

      “but are you sure it’s wise to recommend that people cook unsoaked beans in a crock pot?”

      Nope, not sure.

      I just do it myself and report.

    • Jake on November 2, 2014 at 18:16

      Wondering, could the lack of traditional prep (long soak, water changes) be an aggravating factor to the recent pain you’ve been experiencing…

    • Richard Nikoley on November 3, 2014 at 08:14

      No, it’s been going long before that.

    • Jake on November 4, 2014 at 10:31

      Ah. Hope you get some relief, bro. I’m trying to mindfuck myself out of some raging tinnitus but so far Scotch seems to work best

  6. rob on November 2, 2014 at 14:09

    I buy them in cans, I particularly like the “Faux Southern” canned beans by Glory Foods and Margaret Holmes. The latter has one called “Pepper ‘n’ Peas” which is Field Peas with Jalapeno Peppers, damn it’s good. Both brands also make nice black-eyed peas.

    Then there are the garbanzos and of course the seasoned black beans. Then you have Bush’s chili beans, now they have them in pinto, kidney and black bean varieties.

    So long as you have a can opener you can stock up when they are on sale and live like a king for $3 a day.

  7. James H on November 3, 2014 at 07:14

    “My favorite day at sea is the first day. That’s the day when you get away from everyone who’s trying to help you.”

    It is to laugh. I was the lone Gunner’s Mate on a Coast Guard buoy tender in the mid-Pacific, home port in Guam. My little armory was placed aft below decks and I would spend as much time there as I could cleaning and polishing the various types of firearms allotted to the ship. On good days, while at sea, the only people to whom I was forced to speak were those at morning muster. If I skipped lunch, which was frequent given the quality of the food, the entire workday was spent in solitude.

    • Richard Nikoley on November 3, 2014 at 08:38

      Ha, that works too, but I was talking primarily about the land lubbers. 🙂

    • James H on November 3, 2014 at 11:02

      Yeah, I know you were speaking of the lubbers but my attitude included–and still does–the land. I had a small, cheap apartment for my isolation while on land.

  8. golooraam on November 3, 2014 at 09:57

    Hi Richard,

    Thank you very much for being the n=1 for all this. I have been consuming tigernuts and even made brownies with said tigernut flour the other day (pretty good, although I should have eaten them warm).

    How have you found your body composition change or stay same with all of this bean and lentil consumption?

    • Richard Nikoley on November 3, 2014 at 10:00

      I’m dropping weight with ad libitum eating. Hadn’t seen my wife in about 10 days on Friday and first thing she said was I’d lost weight.

    • golooraam on November 3, 2014 at 10:03

      that is great Richard…
      I am lately switching days from meat and greens days to days I workout and I just have beans (similar to how you prep them) and cold potatoes

    • Richard Nikoley on November 3, 2014 at 10:06

      I agree.

      Cook a pot of beans. Enjoy until done. Cook a pot of rice. Enjoy until done. Boil a bunch of potatoes. Enjoy until done.

    • golooraam on November 3, 2014 at 11:25

      Well – nice job Richard – it’s always awesome when the missus notices – are you still doing your once a week 36 hour fasts? do you find they are easier to do if satiated with a legume based plan?

    • Richard Nikoley on November 3, 2014 at 11:31

      I don’t plan fasts anymore. They just happen. Just the other day I realized i hadn’t eaten anything in over 24 hours.

      Blame it on Game of Thrones.

  9. EF on November 3, 2014 at 12:01

    Alton Brown has a great baked beans-like recipe. Google “alton brown and once and future beans”.

    I halved the amount of bacon and replaced the brown sugar with honey.

    Damn good autumn bean dish.

    • EF on November 3, 2014 at 12:02

      Oh…and a couple fried eggs over those baked beans is heaven.

    • Richard Nikoley on November 3, 2014 at 12:09

      My go-to breakfast is beans & eggs now. Love it. no bacon needed. Though, bits in a bean dish would be fine. Strips taste far too salty for me, now.

  10. Chris on November 5, 2014 at 05:18

    Any recommendations a 5 bean soup mix? Can only find 15 bean soup mixes in the store here in the sticks of Wisconsin.

    • Richard Nikoley on November 5, 2014 at 06:54

      Doesn’t matter. I’d just use the 15.

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