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Autoimmunity, Genetic Engineering, and the Gut Biome

Here’s what I’m up to in terms of drilling down on my Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis. I’m reasonably familiar with the hormonal / enzymatic “pathways.” Duh that the principle TSH feedback is T4, which is why the synthetic T4 I was on from about 1998 – 2007 brought the TSH right down.

However, assuming I had the TPO antibody that antagonizes this enzyme, that basically “makes” T4, then the synthetic T4 supplementation was merely large enough to overcome it and bring down TSH. Easy peasy. It stands to reason that addressing the root, i.e., the antibody, then T4 production might be sufficient on its own and TSH will come down to normal.

A little background. I stopped the T4 sometime in 2007, along with sinus allergy meds and PPIs for GERD, in order to see how well LC paleo, intermittent fasting, and my workout program worked to eliminate those needs. It worked for the other two (and my BP came down so meds for that was no longer on the table), but a TSH in 2008 had it at 16, so no joy there (2-3 outta 3-4 ‘aint bad), and instead of going back on the synthetic T4, I opted for Armour, with subsequent tests putting me in range. I then stopped that a couple of years ago, while increasing carbs, and then later, the whole resistant starch and gut stuff happened. I tested last week with an improved THS in an untreated state.

Am I onto something? I think it’s a legitimate question, not kookiness or quackery. And plus, I’m asymptomatic, in spite of 30-something-crazy-virgin-bitch’s fucktarded but  ”authoritative” assertion  that life is a shambles because of untreated hypothyroidism. More plus, I can start meds any time I want. If this doesn’t pan out, I will, and I’ll just do the synthetic.

70% of the immune system is in the gut. There are enormous associations between autoimmune conditions and the state of the gut and the resident biome. I’ve come to think a bit differently about the gut in terms of resident species. Two primary reasons:

  1. It evolves at a rate of up to many generations every 24 hours.
  2. Horizontal gene transfer is another layer of this evolution.

The problem with speciation is that the xyz species of bacteria you have today may not be precisely the same genetically as the one you had yesterday. So, why not just think of it as a massive genome containing about 300 times the number of genes as your human cells? I understand that species classification is helpful, but it’s not fundamentally what’s going on.

Or, to think of it another way: when you introduce different bacteria via probiotics, and then target feeding them—understanding species are engaged in chemical warfare, are in competition for food—you’re essentially practicing genetic engineering on yourself. Not your human genes, but a genome that affects your own gene expression or repression in various ways.

Neither do I want to overemphasize. After all, it took about 20 years and 50,000 generational turnovers for some of 12 strains of E. coli to emerge into what might be classified a new species.

The E. coli long-term evolution experiment is an ongoing study in experimental evolution led by Richard Lenski that has been tracking genetic changes in 12 initially identical populations of asexual Escherichia coli bacteria since 24 February 1988.[1] The populations reached the milestone of 50,000 generations in February 2010 and 60,000 in in April 2014.[2]

Since the experiment’s inception, Lenski and his colleagues have reported a wide array of genetic changes; some evolutionary adaptations have occurred in all 12 populations, while others have only appeared in one or a few populations. One particularly striking adaption was the evolution of a strain of E. coli that was able to use citric acid as a carbon source in an aerobic environment.[3]

If you drill down, you’ll find it’s that use of citric acid where it arguably emerges as a new species classification.

Of course, given the number and the exponential combinations of potential interactions, all within a framework of rapid evolution given their high generational turnover, it’s too complex to consciously engineer in a precise manner. So we go with associations: what do lean healthy people eat? What does their microbial genetic profile look like? And yes, classification in terms of species is yet another way we simplify or break down the problem into chunks.

I’ve been scrounging a lot of stuff (thanks people), but here’s a couple of papers and a link I’ve been chewing on today.

  • Clearance of Apoptotic Bodies, NETs, and Biofilm DNA: Implications for Autoimmunity – add cell death and clearance to the list of things that effect the evolution of cells and hence, autoimmunity.
  • Molecular Mimicry, the Hygiene Hypothesis, Stealth Infections and Other Examples of Disconnect between Medical Research and the Practice of Clinical Medicine in Autoimmune Disease – “Physicians should look for immune dysregulatory conditions with a strong emphasis on: 1) very early detection with predictive auto-antibodies; 2) a focus on optimizing gastrointestinal mucosal immune function and the microbiome; 3) the eradication of infectious triggers with antimicrobial therapy; 4) the detection and elimination of food sensitivities; and 5) the promotion of an anti-inflamatory lifestyle.”
  • RHR: Pioneering Researcher Alessio Fasano M.D. on Gluten, Autoimmunity & Leaky Gut – Cool fun fact: “mortality — because you could die of celiac disease at that time — for celiac disease dropped from 35%-40% to zero during the war [WWII]. And then when the war was over, the mortality rate for celiac disease went back to pre-war era. And when he tried to understand what was the connection between the war environment and this swing in mortality, he realized that possibly it was the availability of grains containing gluten that really was changing in parallel. So during war, there was no wheat available, and flour was made with potato starch, and that was the time in which the mortality went pretty much to zero. And when after the war, gluten was again available, the disease came back.”

Alright, or just take your thyroid meds and don’t be quacky or stupid… Above all, don’t think for yourself. Listen to crazy bitches, conventional MD’s, and all who present as an authority. You can’t just stop your thyroid meds, you know. You just can’t! Well, I fucking did, twice. So far, I’m better, but still drilling down.

[Insert pussy-ass “disclaimer,” here. Or, you’re on your own.]

Richard Nikoley

I'm Richard Nikoley. Free The Animal began in 2003 and as of 2021, contains 5,000 posts. I blog what I wish...from health, diet, and food to travel and lifestyle; to politics, social antagonism, expat-living location and time independent—while you sleep—income. I celebrate the audacity and hubris to live by your own exclusive authority and take your own chances. Read More

7 Comments

  1. Todd on December 15, 2014 at 10:38

    I don’t see what all the hoopla is about trying to see if this does or doesn’t work for you. Maybe you’ll find something for someone else along the way, but that won’t happen if you just go with the status quo. It’s not like you’re telling everyone else to refrain from using standard medical advice and pharmaceuticals for this.

    Where’s this magic gun you hold on everyone that makes them do and think exactly what you want?

    • Richard Nikoley on December 15, 2014 at 11:13

      “Where’s this magic gun you hold on everyone that makes them do and think exactly what you want?”

      …It was just here somewhere. Hang on. Nope, dog is chewing on it and he doesn’t like to be disturbed. He’ll growl at me.

  2. Groker on December 15, 2014 at 12:54

    Richard

    Ive been reading the comments at Woo place. Sorry for the link

    http://itsthewooo.blogspot.com/2014/12/paleo-quackery-watch-you-cant-cure.html

    Can you tell me about this “farchaise lover that dies?”

    • Richard Nikoley on December 15, 2014 at 13:01

      She was a very important person in my life.

      https://freetheanimal.com/2011/09/a-tribute-gaelle-beyou-1967-2010.html

      I doubt my wife enjoys this part of me, but she gets that I don’t disrespect another in oder to lie to her.

    • doGnuts on December 15, 2014 at 14:05

      Richard,

      I have read this post about Gaelle by you before. But I read it again just then. It brought tears to my eyes just as it did when I read it the first time. It reminds me so much about parts of my own life and how I see them much as yourself. Thanks for sharing (again).

    • Richard Nikoley on December 15, 2014 at 14:14

      “But I read it again just then. It brought tears to my eyes just as it did when I read it the first time.”

      Welcome to the club. I hadn’t read it in a long time either.

  3. Jane Karlsson on December 16, 2014 at 06:53

    “…mortality — because you could die of celiac disease at that time — for celiac disease dropped from 35%-40% to zero during the war [WWII]. And then when the war was over, the mortality rate for celiac disease went back to pre-war era. And when he tried to understand what was the connection between the war environment and this swing in mortality, he realized that possibly it was the availability of grains containing gluten that really was changing in parallel. So during war, there was no wheat available, and flour was made with potato starch, and that was the time in which the mortality went pretty much to zero. And when after the war, gluten was again available, the disease came back.”

    I wonder what country Fasano is talking about. Here in the UK, the situation was completely different. Wheat was available and wheat bread wasn’t even rationed. But it wasn’t WHITE bread. We need to know whether mortality from celiac dropped during WWII here in the UK.

    “White flour was banned for the most part for household use [Ed: it was still allowed commercially in the production of some biscuits, etc.], being replaced by a National Flour, with “wheatmeal” being the official name invented for it. While not quite wholewheat flour (in order to be a bit of a compromise), it left all the bran in it. It was greyish in colour. Some women in desperation would sieve it through their nylon stockings to get white flour; if you kept chickens, the bran sieved out could go to make a ration-free mash for the chickens.

    Bakers were obliged to use the National Flour to make only one type of bread, which was called the National Loaf. Nutritionists praised the composition of the bread (and fought for it to be the only legal bread after the war); the population however dubbed it “Hitler’s Secret Weapon” because they disliked it so much. [Ed: for more information on this bread and National Flour, see the separate entry on National Loaf.] However, it was a success: the government was able to keep the supply plentiful enough that bread was never rationed during the entire war.”
    http://www.cooksinfo.com/british-wartime-food

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